Praying and Journaling: The Perfect Pairing

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I recently led a 2-part Bible study on the Spiritual Disciples. It was helpful and productive. Here, I want to share 2 disciplines in particular, because I believe they work extremely well together when one is trying to grow stronger in the disciplines. Personally, I’ve found that exercising the spiritual disciples in tandem helps immensely, because focusing on one particular discipline at a time can often become monotonous and boring.  The 2 that I’d like to recommend are prayer and journal writing. Here’s how it’s done.

First, find a journal you like. (For me, the journal is almost as important as the discipline itself. If you don’t like the journal, you won’t like the discipline.) Also, find a good pen or pencil, whichever you prefer, to keep with the journal for convenience’s sake. Name it. Date it. Keep loose notes tucked in the back fold. When finished, this journal will be a record of grace and providence.

Next, spend your prayer time writing out your prayers in the journal. This has a number of benefits. For one, you can think more clearly about what you’re praying. You also have a record, a record that you can conveniently return to, of what you’ve prayed for (and why). This will help you keep record of God’s answers, too (cf. Psalms 77:11-12; 116:1-2).

When we pray without journaling, we can become distracted and even forget what or who we should be praying for. Journaling helps keep our prayer life focused, disciplined, and orderly.

Finally, expand on your prayer time (as it’s being journaled) by praying in 4 distinct categories. They are:

  • supplication — this is a prayer of request, as in “let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus” (Philippians 4:6). We all “make the ask” with God, because He cares for us (Psalm 55:22). When we do, it’s called supplication.
  • intercession — this is a prayer made on behalf of someone else. When we pray for someone’s wisdom, health, or especially salvation we’re making intercession for them. Colossians 1:3 says, “We always thank God . . . when we pray for you” (italics added).
  • praise and adoration — this is a prayer that acknowledges the attributes and praiseworthiness of God. Sadly, this category of prayer often suffers, because we don’t know God as we ought. But the Bible tells us that He is good, holy, wise, and powerful. These are just a few attributes worth praising Him for.
  • thanksgiving — this, finally, is a category that speaks for itself–thanksgiving. It’s about expressing to God the gratitude that we have for our lives, our salvation, our forgiveness, our family, our friends, our employment, and the myriad of other things for which we should be thankful. “Bless the Lord, O my soul,” the Psalmist said, “and forget not all his benefits” (Psalm 103:2).

I hope that practicing these disciples in tandem helps you grow spiritually. For me, it’s a nonissue. I nearly always couple these 2 together, and it has helped me immensely. I hope that it helps you, too.

Blessings,

Joe

 

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